"What is at stake when a life is described as “representative”? Whose lives can be considered representative of a culture or a historical moment? Who determines which lives are representative? Where life narratives of the past are concerned, should Misch’s notion be definitive? As cultural critics have argued for well over a decade, such labelling of what is – or is not – representative is part of the cultural project of “naming, controlling, remembering, understanding” that sustains the patriarchal, and imperial, power to produce “knowledge” about the world. If only those people authorized as agents of existing institutions determine the economic value of lives, what are the consequences for our sense of which people can “get a life” and become cultural subjects?"

Sidonie Smith and Julia Watson, Reading Autobiography: A Guide for Interpreting Life Narratives (USA: University of Minnesota Press, 2001), P. 116.

(via literature-and-cats)

I often ask, is the heart more rational than the head? Or is it the other way around?

Absolute freedom…. Well, i had to wash my shorts after landing in an unfortunate mess. Still, I thank nature for existing

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